Coverart for item
The Resource The kidnapping club : Wall Street, slavery, and resistance on the eve of the Civil War, Jonathan Daniel Wells

The kidnapping club : Wall Street, slavery, and resistance on the eve of the Civil War, Jonathan Daniel Wells

Label
The kidnapping club : Wall Street, slavery, and resistance on the eve of the Civil War
Title
The kidnapping club
Title remainder
Wall Street, slavery, and resistance on the eve of the Civil War
Statement of responsibility
Jonathan Daniel Wells
Title variation
Wall Street, slavery, and resistance on the eve of the Civil War
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
  • Prologue: Summer 1832: Norfolk, Virginia -- The battle engaged -- The birth of the Kidnapping Club and the rebirth of Manhattan -- New York divided -- New York, a port in the slave trade -- Policing and criminalizing the Black community -- Economic panic -- No end in sight -- New York and the transatlantic slave trade -- "Blessed be cotton!": the fugitive slave law and New York City -- The Portuguese Company -- New York and secession -- Civil war -- Epilogue: The hidden past and reparations due
  • "Although slavery was outlawed in the northern states in 1827, the illegal slave trade continued in the one place modern readers would least expect, the streets and ports of America's great northern metropolis: New York City. In 'The Kidnapping Club,' historian Jonathan Daniel Wells takes readers to a rapidly changing city rife with contradiction, where social hierarchy clashed with a rising middle class, Black citizens jostled for an equal voice in politics and culture, and women of all races eagerly sought roles outside the home. It is during this time that the city witnessed an alarming trend: a number of free and fugitive Black men, women, and children were being kidnapped into slavery. The group responsible, known as the Kidnapping Club, was a frighteningly effective network of judges, lawyers, police officers, and bankers who circumvented northern anti-slavery laws by sanctioning the kidnapping of free Black Americans--selling them into markets in the South, South America, and the Caribbean, for vast sums of wealth. David Ruggles, a Black journalist and abolitionist, worked tirelessly to bring their injustices to light-risking his own freedom in the process and ultimately exposing the vast system of corruption that made New York City rich. A searing and dramatic history, 'The Kidnapping Club' upends the myth of an abolitionist North at odds with a slavery-loving South. It is a powerful and resonant account of the ties between slavery and capitalism, the deeply corrupt roots of policing in America, and the strength of Black activism"--
Assigning source
Provided by publisher
Biography type
contains biographical information
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1969-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Wells, Jonathan Daniel
Dewey number
974.7/100496073009034
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
F128.44
LC item number
.W377 2020
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Ruggles, David
  • New York Kidnapping Club (Gang)
  • Free African Americans
  • Free African Americans
  • Kidnapping victims
  • Kidnapping victims
  • Fugitive slaves
  • Fugitive slaves
  • Slavery
  • Slave trade
Label
The kidnapping club : Wall Street, slavery, and resistance on the eve of the Civil War, Jonathan Daniel Wells
Instantiates
Publication
Bar code
  • 31223132698664
  • 31223132698649
  • 31223132698656
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Prologue : Summer 1832 : Norfolk, Virginia -- The battle engaged -- The birth of the kidnapping club and the rebirth of Manhattan -- New York divided -- New York, a port in the slave trade -- Policing and criminalizing the black community -- Economic panic -- No end in sight -- New York and the transatlantic slave trade -- "Blessed be cotton!" : the fugitive slave law and New York City -- The Portuguese Company -- New York and secession -- Civil War -- The hidden past and reparations due
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
354 pages
Isbn
9781568587523
Lccn
2020021980
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)1159647235
Label
The kidnapping club : Wall Street, slavery, and resistance on the eve of the Civil War, Jonathan Daniel Wells
Publication
Bar code
  • 31223132698664
  • 31223132698649
  • 31223132698656
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Prologue : Summer 1832 : Norfolk, Virginia -- The battle engaged -- The birth of the kidnapping club and the rebirth of Manhattan -- New York divided -- New York, a port in the slave trade -- Policing and criminalizing the black community -- Economic panic -- No end in sight -- New York and the transatlantic slave trade -- "Blessed be cotton!" : the fugitive slave law and New York City -- The Portuguese Company -- New York and secession -- Civil War -- The hidden past and reparations due
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
354 pages
Isbn
9781568587523
Lccn
2020021980
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)1159647235

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